Met Ed Hare/KA1CV in Timonium, MD

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From: Mike Czuhajewski (Mike.Czuhajewski@hambbs.wb3ffv.ampr.org)
Date: Sun Mar 26 1995 - 02:18:39 EST


Bruce Muscolino, W6TOY, found out that QRPer Ed Hare, KA1CV of the
ARRL lab staff, was coming to the Timonium, MD hamfest to speak
officially on some non-QRP topic. Since he would be free Friday
night before the two day hamfest/ARRL convention, Bruce and I drove
up to meet him, and had a most delightful visit.

Ed operated 20 meter mobile CW QRP all the way down from CT, using
his HW-8. This is the same HW-8 that he removed the final from
several years ago to do some real QRP, at ten milliwatts output, as
documented in QST a few years back, and also on page 2 of QRP
Classics. (I almost didn't recognize him in person since the hair
and beard are much shorter now :-) )

He told us that he put the final back in so he was running full power
on the trip down--a whole watt! We made him lift the cover to let us
verify that the final was really back. (Incidentally, many people
remove radios or stereos from their parked vehicles and carry them
for safety, but this is the first time I saw someone walking away
from a truck with an HW-8 tucked under his arm!)

Ed maintained an air of mystery until after supper; he told us he had
an interesting piece of QRP history that he would show us later but
wouldn't divulge it until the proper moment. To get back at him for
not telling right away, I held up the little pouch I was carrying,
about the size of a pouch for a low cost 35MM camera, and told him it
contained a key, three transmitters, a transceiver and remote VFO.

After the dishes were cleared, he pulled something out of his pocket
and said he bought it at a local hamfest for a dollar. I recognized
it instantly--it was THE Tuna-Tin 2, from the May 1976 issue of QST,
by W1FB. He started telling us that everyone at the ARRL lab was
amazed at such a good copy of the rig in the article, but I knew
instantly that it was no copy! He said that after they examined it
for a while and compared it carefully with the pictures in the
article, it dawned on them that it was the real thing. (The clincher
was the fact that the uneven ends of the Dymo label tapes were
exactly the same as the pictures.)

He said it had been at ARRL but disappeared for some reason over the
years; perhaps someone needed a part--the crystal socket was
missing--and didn't realize what it was and threw it out. Who
knows...the important thing is that an important part of QRP history
has been saved from oblivion. (And no, it didn't smell at all
fishy.)

My turn next--I unzipped the pouch to show all my little QRP rigs and
he was suitably impressed--the Tiny Weekender (a smaller version of
the Ugly Weekender), my QRP Key (miniature key on top of a tiny rig),
my DB-25 transmitter-in-a-pill-bottle, and WG3Rs DB-25 rig. The
latter is a full blown 40M CW transceiver, with built-in VFO, in the
same 3/4 cubic inch bottle that all DB-25 rigs were required to use.
(His was the more impressive of the two transceivers built in the
bottles, since his uses a pair of TUF-1 mixers from Mini Circuits in
a phasing direct conversion receiver--all of this in 3/4 cubic inch!)
 

Although no one has done any soldering on one yet, I showed him the
package for Phase II of the DB-25 challenge--a 0.49 cubic inch box
that holds 5 cartridge fuses. I hold the distinction of being the
first of the 3 people accepting the new challenge to do any work on
it--I have a right angle female SMA connector mounted on the box.
(Unlike Phase I, surface mount devices ARE allowed.)

I didn't exactly tell the whole truth about the "remote VFO".
Although the WG3R DB-25 transceiver contains an internal VFO, as
required by the rules of the challenge, there was a second bottle
with an extra VFO--it was the prototype, and for some reason WG3R
started again from scratch. (The rig doesn't actually have any
provisions for using a remote VFO.)

73 and Queue Our Pea DE WA8MCQ

--
Mike Czuhajewski, user of the UniBoard System @ wb3ffv.ampr.org
E-Mail: Mike.Czuhajewski@hambbs.wb3ffv.ampr.org
The WB3FFV Amateur Radio BBS - Located in Baltimore, Maryland USA
Supporting the Amateur Radio Hobby, and TCP/IP InterNetworking


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