Re: homebrew Y/N Answered from the UK

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From: Edward Pacyna (epacyna@auratek.com)
Date: Sat Feb 19 1994 - 13:43:42 EST


>
>Dick et al,
> To add a little fuel to the fire (but not to flame!) let's look
>at an analogy: One can go to the grocery store and buy ready-made
>cookie dough; once at home one can seperate the the already-sliced
>dough (you don't even get to slice it yourself!) and lay the pieces
>on a cookie sheet and bake until golden brown. Now, can we say that
>those cookies are home-made cookies? I don't think ANYONE would take
>that credit.
>

No, but there are those who will!

Furthermore, it will change the future of amateur radio and qrp.

In the 30's every amateur radio operator built their own transmitter
and receiver. During the 50's it was common to find an amateur station
station with a homebrew transmitter and a commercial receiver. With the
60's came the appliance operator. BTW, W1AAZ is not an OT (first licensed
in 1958 at 12 years of age). Contesting used to be fun. Todays super
stations (equipment and power) took the interest and fun away.

I thought that the homebrew category was meant to promote and preserve the
the spirit of amateur radio by providing a handicap that would account for
the differences in equipment performance.

With the technology and parts avialable today, homebrew has never been
easier. Equipment even approaching state-of-the-art performance can be
constructed by a builder willing to invest in a bit of knowledge, time
and experimentation.
This is unfortunate, for one of the most exciting experiences available to
the radio amateur is the thrill that results from using equipment that
they have constructed themselves.

After the store bought cookie dough, connect the dots and the paint by
the numbers no longer provide thrills, fun, and challenge; will QRP super
station pick up the slack?

>Dick, which came first the callsign or the company name? Kanga - G0ROO -
>that's cute!

As was the lobbying.

BTW, did you know that american GI's homebrewed radio receivers during
WWII? And they made their own diodes too, using a razor blade and a piece
of lead.

73

Ed W1AAZ

talk jeff@auratek.com
talk jeff@auratek
can you give me 5 miotalk jeff @auratek

talkj f 
talk jeff@auratek

can you give me 5 mo nutes more to finish


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