Re[2]: Sugar Pop Morse Code

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From: Mike J Pulley (Mike_J_Pulley@ccm.ch.intel.com)
Date: Tue Sep 27 1994 - 13:50:03 EDT


Text item:

     Jeff Herman asked if there are any American Morse nets still
     around.
     ========================================
     
     The Morse Telegraph Club still has small nets that use American
     Morse.
     
     The club is dedicated to capturing the lore and legend of the
     heydays of Morse Code, its operators, equipment, and ancillary
     nostalgia like railroads, military applications, sea going ships
     and Panama Canal barges. Telegraphy once was the heartbeat of
     the country and the world. The copper wires were entrusted with
     the lifeblood of our budding nation... news of births,
     graduations, weddings, sickness and deaths, travel arrangements,
     sporting events, commercial transactions, elections, wartime
     urgencies, and peacetime reunions. <Sigh. Turn off nostalgic
     ramblings.>
     
     $7 a year will get you their quarterly tabloid called "Dots and
     Dashes" chock full of historical reminiscences and photos, and
     reports on recent telegraph demonstrations, and reenactments. I
     have my hand on some old copies here at my desk that I'm willing
     to mail (limit 1 per customer) to anyone who asks while supplies
     last.
     
     I can get the address for anyone who wants to find out more or
     join MTC.
     
     They report over 600 hams are members (including me) plus scads
     of non-hams, many of whom whacked a key for a living yesteryear.
     Occasionally, they will publish frequencies and times for CW (of
     course!) nets which tend toward American Morse but always switch
     back to International CW for guests. Frankly, I am astounded how
     quickly these OT's can switch between codes. A ham friend of
     mine had to learn Cyrillic (Russian) Morse Code in the Navy many
     years ago and still has trouble keeping it separate from
     International CW in his head. You may stumble across them on 40m
     some evening and wonder what language is being used. IDs are in
     International, but everything else is American. As Jeff points
     out, several of the characters have identical sounds to
     International CW, but quite different meanings. It's guaranteed
     to produce Head-Copy Constipation until you realize that it's not
     a code you are expected to know.
     
     Regards,

     -- Mike, WB4ZKA

     I speak for myself, never for my employer over the INTERNET.
     ==============================================================
     Mike Pulley Intel Corporation
     Phoenix, Arizona (USA) Mike_J_Pulley@ccm.hf.intel.com
     "People who say that there is no panacea have just never owned
       a Swiss army knife." -- Thomas Sowell, 12/3/93
     ==============================================================

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Subject: Re: Sugar Pop Morse Code
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>From: jeffrey@math.hawaii.edu (Jeffrey Herman)
Date: Mon, 26 Sep 94 22:52:31 HST
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